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If you can't make it to a class—or if you're just curious about what to expect—watch this video of a class from It's My Park on NYC TV (3:58).

Learn to Ride 1

Classes are held at public parks, block parties, and in school play yards throughout New York City.

Learn to Ride 2

Classes are held at public parks, block parties, and in school play yards throughout New York City.

Learn to Ride 3

Learn to Ride instructors explain the "balancing first" method to groups of students throughout each class session. Instructors then follow-up with kids as they progress through the process at their own pace.

DateTimeLocationNotes
Sat, 4/2611:00 am - 3:00 pmManhattan, Thomas Jefferson Park, 114th St & 1st Ave [Map >]Register >
Sat, 4/261:00 pm - 3:00 pmManhattan: Central Park East II Public School [Map >]FULL.
Sat, 4/262:00 pm - 4:00 pmBrooklyn, Carroll Gardens: PS 146/Brooklyn New School [ Map >]Register >
Sat, 5/310:00 am - 12:00 pmManhattan, Basketball City, 299 South St [Map >]Bike Expo event! Register >
Sat, 5/310:00 am - 1:00 pmBrooklyn, Brower Park: Prospect Place & Kingston Ave [Map >]Register >
Sat, 5/310:00 am - 1:00 pmBronx, Pelham Bay Park, parking area next to running track [Map >]Register >
Sat, 5/310:00 am - 1:00 pmQueens, Juniper Park, Juniper Blvd North & 80th St [Map >]Register >
Sat, 5/311:00 am - 2:00 pmManhattan, Corporal John A. Seravalli Playground, Horatio & Hudson Sts. [Map >]Register >
Sat, 5/312:00 pm - 2:00 pmManhattan, Basketball City, 299 South St [Map >]Bike Expo event! Register >
Sat, 5/1010:00 am - 1:00 pmBronx, Van Cortlandt Park, SW Playground next to Major Deegan Expressway [Map >]Register >

Learn to Ride classes will resume in April 2014 and will be held through October 2014. All class dates, times, and locations are subject to change.

Learn to Ride — Kids is a free group class for children who are ready to ditch their training wheels and ride a two-wheeler for the first time. Through a safe, easy, effective method, Bike New York’s experienced instructors help parents teach their kids how to balance, pedal, start, stop, and steer a bicycle. Most kids get it in one session, but even if they don’t, parents leave knowing an easy, crash-free, low stress technique that will have their kids riding independently in a short amount of time.

Course Content

Learn to Ride — Kids teaches the fundamental elements of bicycling through the “balance-first” method, where instructors and parents provide guidance and encouragement while the child does most of the work.

  • Adjusting your child’s helmet for a comfortable, effective fit
  • Balancing on a bicycle
  • Pedaling
  • Steady starting and stopping
  • Steering with control

Course Format

Learn to Ride teaches the fundamental elements of cycling to those who never learned to ride or who haven’t been on a bike in a long while.

Class duration: 3 hours
Class location: Controlled, outdoor environment
Class size: Unlimited
Instructors: One trained class captain and volunteers
Instructor to student ratio: 1 to 8, on average
Equipment necessary: Bicycle* and helmet
Availability of loaner bikes: None
Registration policy: Advance registration is preferred; walk-in students are allowed

*Parents must be sure that the bicycle fits their child and is in good working order (i.e., wheels spin freely, brakes function). The child must be able to rest his or her feet flat on the ground while sitting on the bicycle seat. Training wheels should be removed in advance and tires should be inflated until they are rock hard.

Is This the Right Class for Your Child?

Are you struggling to teach your child to ride a bike the old-fashioned way? Did your child have a bad experience trying to ride and you’re ready to throw in the towel? Are you and your child interested in enjoying a positive community event where dozens of kids learn to ride a bike together? If so, Learn to Ride — Kids is the class for you.Learn to Ride — Kids is open to children ages 5 and up. Each participant must attend with a legal guardian. Participants over 14 years old should consider attending a Learn to Ride — Adultsclass.Does your child already know how to ride a bike? Now it’s time for Bike Driver’s Ed, where kids practice their bike handling skills, learn basic traffic principles, and simulate street and sidewalk riding scenarios with experienced instructors.

Registration Details

The 2012 class season has ended. Outdoor Learn to Ride – Kids classes will resume in April 2013. Please check back in February to view a class schedule and to register.

Rain Policy

Learn to Ride — Kids classes are canceled in the event of rain; please check the education department’s weather hotline at 212 870 2080 ext. 2 if in doubt. Those registered for a class that is canceled because of rain will be invited to register for a later class date within the established season schedule.

Next Steps

Once you attend a Learn to Ride — Kids class and your child has a handle on balancing and pedaling a bike, you may be interested in Bike New York’s free Bike Driver’s Edclinic, where kids practice their bike handling skills, learn basic traffic principles, and simulate street and sidewalk riding scenarios with experienced instructors.If you are interested in private instruction, visit the League of American Bicyclists websiteto find a certified cycling instructor in your area.Also consider paying it forward! Many of the volunteers who help you and your child at a class started out on the student side of the handlebars. Find out how you can help others learn to ride here.
Donate

Click below to make a donation and support Bike New York's work! More info >>

Traffic Smarts Quiz

Before your next ride, test yourself with these 12 questions to find out how well you know your rights and responsibilities as a street cyclist.

Did You Know?

Just 30 years ago, two-thirds of all school students walked or biked to school. Today, fewer than 10% of schoolchildren get to school by walking or cycling.